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at military bases worldwide from iraq to a afghanistan and guantanamo bay. he travels with his group, which you have heard about. the cookies on the table are a tribute to that. they're the focus of a feature- length documentary, "lieutenant dan band: for the common good." it has a website. people can watch that. part of the proceeds will benefit the gary sinise foundation. while dismissing the speculation that he is running for political office, but we might follow up on that today, our guest has been an outspoken critic of bureaucracy and red tape that delays service members and veterans from getting care. he has said the nation is not doing enough to help disabled veterans and troops wounded in iraq and afghanistan. he has called on the government and private sector to spend more to the veterans provide victims of post-traumatic stress disorder, give them some help. he is a star who moonlights as a soldier's advocate. our speaker has questioned his own industry at times for producing films that portray our troops in a sometimes negative light. in partial response, our speakers served as
have expanded radically with involvement in afghanistan and iraq. as we will hear, the u.s. as crated a police force in iraq that may number as many as 400,000 personnel. the goal of the u.s.-led nato training effort is at 157,000 police and the cost of this training program to the u.s. alone is about $1 billion per month. today, police assistance programs in the government are in multibillion-dollar effort led by the departments of defense and the department state but involving a number of other federal agencies. as programs have grown in size and cost, they also grow in kind. as you saw from the exhibition here on the screen, policing around the world is heavily impacted by history, culture, legal systems, and level of development. police forces differ markedly, so do they differ by agency and the country in which they work in. today, we have assembled a panel of very distinguished experts to discuss the various approaches that the u.s. government takes towards police training in foreign countries. you have the bad reviews for our speakers, so i will not do that. the speakers will c
troops home from afghanistan. i do that because i have the privilege to represent the third district of north carolina, the home of camp lejeune marine base, cherry point and seymour johnson air force base. i have been privileged since i didn't serve to have great relationships with active duty and retired marines in the district, and i want to share with this house, mr. speaker, that we continue to support a corrupt leader and a corrupt government. just recently, the half brother of mr. karzai, half brother named wali karzai, was murdered in afghanistan. this only reinforces the fact that afghanistan is in a fragile situation at every level of their government. it is in chaos, quite frankly. just this week i spoke with a marine colonel who's been to afghanistan three times. he was in my office on tuesday, and he shared the same sentiments as the retired marine general who has been advising me for 20 months, and recently i emailed the general and said, please give me your ideas of what mr. obama has proposed in bringing 10,000 of our troops out in july and then another 23,000 in -- n
and not put them on the backs of our seniors. the wars in iraq and afghanistan, the president has already begun a drawdown a it could be significant so we save in the long run. making certain that people are back to work so they are contributing to our tax base in a way that we need. and we know that we have to raise revenue. we must race revenue. our seniors understand that. but what we cannot do is shift the burden for these things that were not caused by seniors onto the backs of our seniors by pushing them into really unfair cuts to their medicare and social security benefits. . mr. tonko: i'm going to do a bit of close and then ask each of the representatives that remain here on the floor, we were joined earlier by representative chu from california, to offer your sentiments and then we'll bring the hour to a close. but you know, what i think is very important to note is that if we can find ways to save on medicare we should invest that in medicare to strengthen medicare. if we can find ways to save in social security, reinvest in social security. they deserve to be stand alones beca
it comes to discussing the merits of continuing our efforts in afghanistan, the republicans clamor to defend it despite our fiscal mess. i want to remind my republican friends the situation we are in now is not new. throughout history from rome to the ottoman empire to the soviet union the over extension of military and protracted struggles in foreign countries has crippled empires. some historians have credited ronald reagan for the soviet union's collapse but what really bankrupted the soviet union was its wars, just like us, they paid a crushing price both financially and morally in afghanistan. overextending geopolitically comes at a cost over time in any nation that thinks otherwise is setting itself up to repeat the mistakes of the past. as of today, the united states has spent more than 2 1/2 times the percentage of g.d.p. on afghanistan that the -- than the soviet union spent on its g.d.p. during its nine-year war in afghanistan. public polls are clear, americans know the cost of the war in afghanistan is unsustainable and want us to withdraw as soon as possible. when it co
to be done, what we're going to keep and what cut. i would like to see all the troops that are in afghanistan and iraq come home. we simply cannot afford it as a nation. host: let's go to comments made by jay carney yesterday at the white house, press secretary if talking about cut, cap, and balance proposal by republicans, and why he thinks it's worse than the ryan budget plan. >> it requires the passage of a balanced budget amendment and all this would require the even more draconian cuts than the ones that were in the right and budget. a cut in cleana 1 energy and a significant dismantling of social security plans and medicaid. congressman ryan's plan did not deal with social security, but the draconian savings that are called for in this measure, you have to do that to these programs. we don't need these kinds of measures. what we need is congress to get to work to agree to compromise, to agree to do the work of the american people instead of satisfying a narrow slice of the political spectrum. host: white house press secretary jay carney speaking yesterday. today c-span's facebook page w
on fuel and provide more enticing amenities to passengers. from afghanistan, the taliban says that their leader is alive and that a text message an internet posting announcing -- end internet posting announcing his death are fake. those are some of the latest headlines on c-span radio. >> is weakened on "booktv," on c-span -- and this weekend on "booktv," on c-span2. on afterwards -- "after words," ben mezrich. look for the complete schedule at booktv.org. sign up for our e-mail alerts to get the schedule in your in box. -- inbox. >> "the supreme court" -- the new edition includes an interview with the newest supreme court justice, elena kagen, and you can add -- elena kagan. and you can add to your experience with -- "washington journal" continues. host: as we continue our precision about the debt ceiling and other related issues, we're pleased -- are, were stationed about the debt ceiling and other related issues, we're pleased to be joined by the chief deputy whip on the house side, peter welch. tell us why you voted against cut, cap, and balance ac yest today in the house
and afghanistan, and at the time that we have gone to war, that is what we did the bush tax cuts, the corporate tax cuts that further douglas into the economic hole that we are in. it is -- that further doug us into the economical that we are in. it is the first time in history. host: here is a tweet. guest: those are the priorities that are laid before congress. we have a hearing yesterday where we did a land exchange. republicans passed a totally partisan votes. copper orr in the state of arizona will be taken out, no royalties paid for by a foreign company. it will be shipped to china for their industry that is growing. but no royalties, nothing bad for the american taxpayer. yet we wonder how we got ourselves into the situation we arwin. host: just announced, unemployment applications fall for a second week, few more -- fewer people sought unemployment benefits. the labor department says weekly applications dropped 22,000 to a seasonally adjusted 405,000, the lowest level in almost three months. was the employment situation in your district? guest: unfortunately, yuma county leads the natio
, the report on u.s. troops in southern afghanistan. >> this week on "he renee", a new book by former wall street journal reporter scott miller. it tells the story of america at the turn of the 20th century when william mckinley was shot by an assassin. >> scott miller, why did you decide to do a book on the assassination of william mckinley? >> you know, i had been interested in this period in the 1880's and 1890's. i think it's just a really fascinating and important, really turning point in american history. before then, you had a united states that really would have been recognized by the founding fathers. after this date, by the turn of the century, it's the america that we would know today. and there's just a tremendous zeitgeist and enthusiasm and patriotism in this period. i think it all makes it very romantic. i mean, you just look right the way through american society, and you see it in industry. you know, of course, we think of the tycoons and the trusts. but there was just a proliferation of new products. i mean, you'd be hard-pressed to go to a grocery store now where you did
at military bases worldwide from iraq to afghanistan to guantanamo bay. most often, he travels with his group, which you have heard about. the cookies on the table are a tribute to that. they are the focus of a feature-length documentary that chronicles the band travels to entertain the troops. they have a website. they are doing a launch very soon where people can watch that. kfar the proceeds will benefit the gary sinise foundation. while dismissing the speculation that he is running for political office -- [laughter] but we might follow up on that today. our guest has been an outspoken critic of bureaucracy and red tape that often delays and prevents service members and veterans from getting care and benefits. he has said the nation is not doing enough to help disabled veterans and u.s. troops wounded in iraq and afghanistan. he has called on the government to -- and the private sector to spend more on victims of posttraumatic stress disorder and get them some help. he is a star who moonlights as a soldier's advocate. our speaker has questioned his own industry at times while producing fil
and afghanistan. not a huge amount of money. by the way, when people wonder why -- what's happening to the s.e.c. and the f.t.c. are exhibits a and before. we would have been much further along. i think you should not hold off on it. i got some cost-benefit analysis on infrastructure in afghanistan and some of the other things that they are for. i think it is a reasonable thing to do. as long as the cost includes, of course, the financial crisis of -- and the lost revenue and jobs and turmoil. that's the cost. the cost is the terrible crisis we had. although -- i notice that alan sloan has come out with a thorough analysis that is going to be printed in "fortune" about how much money we made over the intervention, the combination of the tarp and the federal reserve and made about $100 billion for the federal government. >> [inaudible] just as a related question, you talked about the bailout being over. if -- are we really to believe that -- >> i will not comment on any financial institution. you get to be chairman or you're a ranking member and you have more nevertheless but you have got to
afghanistan. after that, republican congressman thaddeus mccotter announces his candidacy for the president next, prime minister's questions from the british house of commons. this week, prime minister david cameron defended his government's plans for reforming the health plan. tax breaks for individuals to choose private health plans. >> questions for the prime minister. >> thank you, mr. speaker. this morning i had meetings with ministerial colleagues and others and in addition to my duties in the house, i shall have further such meetings later in the day. >> what does my friends say to the teachers who are putting the education of the children first by not striking tomorrow? >> i would congratulate them for doing the right thing and for doing the right thing and for
billion on katrina. in afghanistan we spend $325 billion -- million a day and in iraq we've spent about $100 million a day. that's almost $1 billion a day. we're talking about $950 -- almost $1 billion in light rail. we can both be right and smart and compassionate if we do the right thing. in our budgeting process we should have an unexpected fund for unforeseen circumstances, we should have learned from katrina. we're looking at probably about $4 billion in term of army corps of engineers. i think our leaderships need to get together and just say that we can do this without fighting among each other, without making each other wrong. because that's wrong. in the eyes of the public, they want us to do the job that needs to get done and have our leadership do that. and so my plea is that we can be fiscally responsible and we can be compassionate and we do that with good planning and good budgeting process, including having contingency funds that should have been there. and so we have an opportunity right now to show the public that we can do all these things and still come out winners fo
about fraud in afghanistan, iraq, pakistan, and now the congress wants us, after giving away our jobs, not fair trade, free trade agreements -- now they want to go back and give them away with korea. i cannot believe the direction that this country has gone in. we keep talking about corporate tax rates. that is the key word. "rate." they are not paying 35%. they are paying 4%, 6%, 9%, and i am making up the difference. the irs is after a relative of mine who lost their job. they owe them $5,000. karzei and his brother have walked off with billions of dollars and our congress cannot seem to stop it. guest: well, there is a lot there. obviously, a lot of these countries, and it is very disappointing to see fraud and hopefully over time it will go down, i do not want to make any excuses for it because there are no excuses for that activity. a lot of these countries do not have the same developed a rule of law that we have over here. even in our country, there have been instances of fraud and bribery and things like that. there were huge problems in its new jersey and in the past. in illi
the war in afghanistan, we must fix the politics." host: back to the phones and the public's discussion, asheville, n.c., george -- joyce. caller: we do not have any say in what congress says it through our president except through voting. i call them all the time and make my voice heard. sometimes they are not nice to me. i think that the biggest problem in this country are the illegals that come in here to of our country and a protest. the taxes of this country are taking care of them. they will hit the streets in georgia this time. arizona and other states. host: you said you had had contact? caller: just about my complaints with social security and medicare. host: their response to you? caller: they just listen to me sometimes. sometimes they say thank you for calling. host: you have spoke to them on the phone? caller: i was complaining more about illegals, i think that is the biggest problem of the nation. host: i am going t let you go now. we have this biggest -- we have this twitter message. host: auburn they'll, florida, you are on washington journal. caller: they never listen t
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15

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